What is multiple intelligence learning

what is multiple intelligence learning

Howard Gardner's Theory of Multiple Intelligences

Over the past few decades, research in the field of learning has led to the discovery of the Theory of Multiple Intelligences. In short, this theory states that each person has different ways of learning and different intelligences they use in their daily lives. While some can learn very well in a linguistically-based environment (reading and writing), others are better taught through mathematical-logic based . Feb 24, Multiple intelligences and learning styles are commonly confused with one another, but they are not the same. Multiple intelligences represent different intellectual abilities and strengths, whereas learning styles are about how an individual may approach a task/5(36).

Actively scan device characteristics for identification. Use precise geolocation data. Select personalised content. Create a personalised content profile. Whzt ad performance. Select basic ads. Create a personalised ads profile.

Select personalised ads. Apply market research to generate audience insights. Measure content performance. Develop and improve products. List of Partners vendors. You may have heard the term "learning style" used to describe how a child learns as in, one child learns best visually while another learns best through movement.

The problem with such characterizations is that all kids learn through various methodssight, touch, etc. While a child may absorb information better through one approach at one point in time, that same child intrlligence learn something else better through another approach.

Labeling children as having just one learning style is wgat and limiting. A much better way to understand the individuality of how kids learn is to apply the concept of "multiple intelligences. InHoward Gardnera developmental psychologist and the John H. Hobbs Professor of Cognition and Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, disputed the idea multlple people are born with a single intelligence that can be measuredsuch as with IQ tests and cannot be changed.

According to Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences MIsthere are at least eight different human intelligences, and all human beings are born with varying degrees what type of ethernet cable each. Gardner also asserts that people have unique and distinct intelligence profiles that are shaped by biological and environmental factors. For example, one child may have stronger musical intelligence and mathematical intelligence while another may have a stronger linguistic or interpersonal intelligence.

These distinct MI inntelligence are different because of individual experiences and genetic ix. Gardner defines the eight types of MI as the following. Parents know that kids have how to plug stereo speakers into a computer abilities, interests, likes, and dislikes. One child may devour books and love to dance, another may love animals, and a third may love music and math.

But it's important not to label a child as being one thing or another. For example, when you say a child learns best by working with their hands, you are ignoring lfarning fact muotiple all kids learn through all kinds of different methods, and that intellitence they learn best or what they are good at can change over time. To nurture and support MI in your children at home:. Since each individual has their ,ultiple unique multiple intelligence profile, teachers should present informationand allow kids to show what they have learnedin various ways.

For instance, a teacher can teach children about what is multiple intelligence learning water cycle by not only talking about it, but also by playing a film about it. They could also have kids create models or do a performance to demonstrate what they've learned. They can perhaps read about the machine. Kornhaber referenced an example of an elementary school in which a science teacher and a social studies teacher developed a real archaeological dig.

Presenting a subject in various ways gives students more opportunities to understand the material. Os also helps them understand the material how to draw a tower fully because they think about it in several different ways.

Understanding multiple intelligences can help teachers and parents give kids a richer learning experience. Get diet and wellness tips to help your kids stay healthy and happy.

The neuroscience of intelligence: Empirical support for the theory of multiple intelligences? Trends Neurosci Educ. Shearer B. J Intell. Gardner H. New York: Basic Books; Child Dev. Engaging families in physical activity learninh a family-based focus group study. BMC Public Health. Your Privacy Rights.

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Table of Contents View All. Table of Contents. What Are the Multiple Intelligences? Multiple Intelligences at Home. Multiple Intelligences at Lewrning. Was this page helpful? Thanks for your feedback! Sign Up. What are your concerns? Article Sources. Verywell Family uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and lexrning our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

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Gardners Multiple Intelligences Summarized Verbal-linguistic intelligence (well-developed verbal skills and sensitivity to the sounds, meanings and rhythms of Logical-mathematical intelligence (ability to think conceptually and abstractly, and capacity to discern logical and Spatial-visual. Jul 20, According to Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences (MIs), there are at least eight different human intelligences, and all human beings are born with varying degrees of each. 2 ? Gardner also asserts that people have unique and distinct intelligence profiles that are shaped by biological and environmental factors. Gardner's Theory of Multiple Intelligences 1 Linguistic Intelligence (word smart). Linguistic Intelligence is a part of Howard Gardner's multiple intelligence 2 Logical-Mathematical Intelligence (number/reasoning smart). Logical-mathematical intelligence refers to the capacity 3 Spatial.

Many educators have had the experience of not being able to reach some students until presenting the information in a completely different way or providing new options for student expression. Perhaps it was a student who struggled with writing until the teacher provided the option to create a graphic story, which blossomed into a beautiful and complex narrative. Or maybe it was a student who just couldn't seem to grasp fractions, until he created them by separating oranges into slices. Because of these kinds of experiences, the theory of multiple intelligences resonates with many educators.

It supports what we all know to be true: A one-size-fits-all approach to education will invariably leave some students behind. However, the theory is also often misunderstood, which can lead to it being used interchangeably with learning styles or applying it in ways that can limit student potential. The theory of multiple intelligences challenges the idea of a single IQ, where human beings have one central "computer" where intelligence is housed. Howard Gardner, the Harvard professor who originally proposed the theory, says that there are multiple types of human intelligence, each representing different ways of processing information:.

One common misconception about multiple intelligences is that it means the same thing as learning styles. Instead, multiple intelligences represents different intellectual abilities. Learning styles, according to Howard Gardner, are the ways in which an individual approaches a range of tasks. They have been categorized in a number of different ways -- visual, auditory, and kinesthetic, impulsive and reflective, right brain and left brain, etc.

Gardner argues that the idea of learning styles does not contain clear criteria for how one would define a learning style, where the style comes, and how it can be recognized and assessed.

He phrases the idea of learning styles as "a hypothesis of how an individual approaches a range of materials. Everyone has all eight types of the intelligences listed above at varying levels of aptitude -- perhaps even more that are still undiscovered -- and all learning experiences do not have to relate to a person's strongest area of intelligence.

Someone with high visual-spatial intelligence, such as a skilled painter, may still benefit from using rhymes to remember information. As Gardner states, "When one has a thorough understanding of a topic, one can typically think of it in several ways. While additional research is still needed to determine the best measures for assessing and supporting a range of intelligences in schools, the theory has provided opportunities to broaden definitions of intelligence.

As an educator, it is useful to think about the different ways that information can be presented. However, it is critical to not classify students as being specific types of learners nor as having an innate or fixed type of intelligence. Having an understanding of different teaching approaches from which we all can learn, as well as a toolbox with a variety of ways to present content to students, is valuable for increasing the accessibility of learning experiences for all students.

To develop this toolbox, it is especially important to gather ongoing information about student strengths and challenges as well as their developing interests and activities they dislike. Providing different contexts for students and engaging a variety of their senses -- for example, learning about fractions through musical notes, flower petals, and poetic meter -- is supported by research. As our insatiable curiosity about the learning process persists and studies continue to evolve, scientific research may emerge that further elaborates on multiple intelligences, learning styles, or perhaps another theory.

To learn more about the scientific research on student learning, visit our Brain-Based Learning topic page. Darling-Hammond, L. Hattie, J. New York, NY: Routledge. Tomlinson, C. Howard Gardner's Eight Intelligences The theory of multiple intelligences challenges the idea of a single IQ, where human beings have one central "computer" where intelligence is housed. Howard Gardner, the Harvard professor who originally proposed the theory, says that there are multiple types of human intelligence, each representing different ways of processing information: Verbal-linguistic intelligence refers to an individual's ability to analyze information and produce work that involves oral and written language, such as speeches, books, and emails.

Logical-mathematical intelligence describes the ability to develop equations and proofs, make calculations, and solve abstract problems. Visual-spatial intelligence allows people to comprehend maps and other types of graphical information. Musical intelligence enables individuals to produce and make meaning of different types of sound. Naturalistic intelligence refers to the ability to identify and distinguish among different types of plants, animals, and weather formations found in the natural world.

Bodily-kinesthetic intelligence entails using one's own body to create products or solve problems. Interpersonal intelligence reflects an ability to recognize and understand other people's moods, desires, motivations, and intentions. Intrapersonal intelligence refers to people's ability to recognize and assess those same characteristics within themselves.

The Difference Between Multiple Intelligences and Learning Styles One common misconception about multiple intelligences is that it means the same thing as learning styles. Practices Supported by Research Having an understanding of different teaching approaches from which we all can learn, as well as a toolbox with a variety of ways to present content to students, is valuable for increasing the accessibility of learning experiences for all students.

Specifically: Providing students with multiple ways to access content improves learning Hattie, Providing students with multiple ways to demonstrate knowledge and skills increases engagement and learning, and provides teachers with more accurate understanding of students' knowledge and skills Darling-Hammond, Instruction should be informed as much as possible by detailed knowledge about students' specific strengths, needs, and areas for growth Tomlinson, References Darling-Hammond, L.

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