What is the history of bath salts

what is the history of bath salts

Bath Salts - Drug Fact Sheet

BATH SALTS: A SHORT HISTORY. The drugs now known as Bath Salts were first synthesized (artificially created) in France in and Some were originally researched for potential medical use, but most of the drugs created were unsuccessful due to severe side effects, including dependency. Abuse of these drugs started in the former Soviet Union in the s and 40s, where . Oct 15,  · Bath Salts Drug History Bath salts were first created in France around It was originally researched to find a medical use for it, but most of its original formulas were harmful and caused severe side effects, including addiction. The history of bath salt abuse began between the s and 40s in the former Soviet Union.

If you make and sell handmade bath saltsyou may understand the health benefits of your product but not its interesting history. Chinese pharmacology records dating all the way back to B. In these early records, over 40 different types of salts are mentioned, many of which are still in use today.

Salt has been an important consumer good for centuries, and was commonly used by the early cultures of Asia and Europe. In some areas of the world, salts were actually used as currency for purchasing slaves and paying soldiers. Salts that were traded back in the early days of civilization were used exclusively for flavoring bland foods.

History shows bath salts were frequently used how to find banking information on a cheque their healing properties and were common in medicines and home remedies for curing a variety of conditions, including skin diseases, arthritis, and sore muscles.

Salt was often combined with water to create a brine people would soak in, much like the bath salt soaks people enjoy today. Salt was also made into a variety of topical ointments, meant to treat everything from acne to fine lines and wrinkles.

The popularity and healing benefits of salt played a large factor in the establishment of communal bath houses. People would often visit the public baths to relax and rejuvenate their body, but also to mingle with other locals what is the processes of science personal conversations and to discuss business. These relaxing bath houses became so popular, luxury resorts began opening throughout Asia, focused on the restorative properties of bath salts used in water.

Inan English doctor published an article detailing the healing effects of seawater, made of natural salts. This brought the masses to the coastal waters of France and Great Britain who wanted to take advantage of the power of ocean water. New hospitals started opening around the sea and soon the term thalassotherapy, meaning sea care in Greek, was coined to describe the therapeutic bath salt treatments available in newly created clinics.

The new salt bath resorts and luxury spas were similar to what we have today. People enjoyed bath salt treatments to reduce muscle tension, melt away stress, and detoxify the body. Bath salts were also touted as a method to improve blood circulation, enhance weight loss, and even treat cramping and associated symptoms of menstruation and menopause.

In modern times, bath salt treatments are still an incredibly popular service available at spas around the world. Thanks to the advancements in bath salt bombs and other products now available, more and more people are using these products in the comfort of their own home. This mineral is what gives bath salts the power to soothe tired, aching muscles and revive your overall well-being. Promoting the healing benefits of bath salts is a great way to show your customers your product is more than just a pretty color that fizzes in your bath.

Learn more about available packaging options for your bath salts, including plastic and glass bath salt containersjars, and bottles to enhance your bath salt business. Browse through BottleStore. Your email address will not be published. Jonathan BottleStore. Berk Company. In addition to making BottleStore work and run smoothly, Jonathan also enjoys passing on packaging knowledge to help solve customer pain points. He is the chief architect of Packaging Crash Course - a packaging resource hub for rigid glass and plastic packaging site.

Author: Jonathan BottleStore. Why Do Bath Bombs Fizz? Make Your Own Bath Bombs. Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Kale by LyraThemes.

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History shows bath salts were frequently used for their healing properties and were common in medicines and home remedies for curing a variety of conditions, including skin diseases, arthritis, and sore muscles. Salt was often combined with water to create a brine people would soak in, much like the bath salt soaks people enjoy today. Sep 20,  · A Brief History of Bath Salts Synthetic cathinones were first cooked up in France in the s, after which the drug slumbered in obscurity until an underground chemist rediscovered it and published the recipe on the Web. The Web site was shut down in , but not before khat-like substances entered the Israeli scene as the drug likedatingus.com: Nicholas Gerbis. Bath Salts - Drug Fact Sheet June 05, DEA's revised and updated drug fact sheet about synthetic stimulants known by the street name "bath salts" - what are they, what is their origin, what are the common street names for these drugs, what do they look like, how are they abused, what their effect is on the mind and bodies of users including.

Synthetic cathinones, more commonly known as bath salts, are human-made stimulants chemically related to cathinone, a substance found in the khat plant. Khat is a shrub grown in East Africa and southern Arabia, where some people chew its leaves for their mild stimulant effects. Human-made versions of cathinone can be much stronger than the natural product and, in some cases, very dangerous. Synthetic cathinone products marketed as bath salts should not be confused with products such as Epsom salt that people use during bathing.

These bathing products have no mind-altering ingredients. Synthetic cathinones usually take the form of a white or brown crystal-like powder and are sold in small plastic or foil packages labeled "not for human consumption. Synthetic cathinones are part of a group of drugs that concern public health officials called new psychoactive substances NPS. NPS are unregulated psychoactive mind-altering substances with no legitimate medical use and are made to copy the effects of controlled substances.

They are introduced and reintroduced into the market in quick succession to dodge or hinder law enforcement efforts to address their manufacture and sale. Synthetic cathinones are marketed as cheap substitutes for other stimulants such as amphetamines and cocaine.

People can buy synthetic cathinones online and in drug paraphernalia stores under a variety of brand names, which include:. Much is still unknown about how synthetic cathinones affect the human brain. Researchers do know that synthetic cathinones are chemically similar to drugs like amphetamines, cocaine, and MDMA.

A study found that 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone MDPV , a common synthetic cathinone, affects the brain in a manner similar to cocaine, but is at least 10 times more powerful. MDPV is the most common synthetic cathinone found in the blood and urine of patients admitted to emergency departments after taking bath salts.

Molly—slang for molecular—refers to drugs that are supposed to be the pure crystal powder form of MDMA. Usually purchased in capsules, Molly has become more popular in the past few years. Some people use Molly to avoid additives such as caffeine, methamphetamine, and other harmful drugs commonly found in MDMA pills sold as Ecstasy.

But those who take what they think is pure Molly may be exposing themselves to the same risks. Law enforcement sources have reported that Molly capsules contain harmful substances including synthetic cathinones. For example, hundreds of Molly capsules tested in two South Florida crime labs in contained methylone, a dangerous synthetic cathinone. Raised heart rate, blood pressure, and chest pain are some other health effects of synthetic cathinones.

People who experience delirium often suffer from dehydration, breakdown of skeletal muscle tissue, and kidney failure. The worst outcomes are associated with snorting or needle injection. Intoxication from synthetic cathinones has resulted in death.

Yes, synthetic cathinones can be addictive. Animal studies show that rats will compulsively self-administer synthetic cathinones. Human users have reported that the drugs trigger intense, uncontrollable urges to use the drug again.

Taking synthetic cathinones can cause strong withdrawal symptoms that include:. As with all addictions, health care providers should screen for co-occurring mental health conditions. While there are no FDA-approved medicines for synthetic cathinone addiction, there are medicines available for common co-occurring conditions. This publication is available for your use and may be reproduced in its entirety without permission from NIDA. Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health.

Drug Topics. More Drug Topics. Quick Links. About NIDA. What are synthetic cathinones? Points to Remember Synthetic cathinones, more commonly known as bath salts, are drugs that contain one or more human-made chemicals related to cathinone, a stimulant found in the khat plant. Synthetic cathinones are marketed as cheap substitutes for other stimulants such as methamphetamine and cocaine.

People typically swallow, snort, smoke, or inject synthetic cathinones. Much is still unknown about how the chemicals in synthetic cathinones affect the human brain. Synthetic cathinones can cause: paranoia increased sociability increased sex drive hallucinations panic attacks Intoxication from synthetic cathinones has resulted in death.

Synthetic cathinones can be addictive. Behavioral therapy may be used to treat addiction to synthetic cathinones. No medications are currently available to treat addiction to synthetic cathinones.

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