What the vikings did for us

what the vikings did for us

Norse colonization of North America

Nov 17,  · Vikings were peoples from areas of Scandinavia - Denmark, Sweden, and Norway - who planted crops in spring and raided towns overseas in summer. The Viking Age - when they were most active in their. Nov 06,  · From around A.D. to the 11th century, a vast number of Scandinavians left their homelands to seek their fortunes elsewhere. These seafaring warriors–known collectively as Vikings or .

The Vikings traded and raided across Europe and even reached as far as North America, leaving their mark on just about every land they conquered. So much so, that many elements of their heritage and culture still very much exist today. Take a look at just a few things we can thank the Vikings for:. The Vikings first attacked England in A. Examples include the word berserk stemming from the Old Norse word "berserker", which meant "bear shirt" or "bearskin" and "klubber" which today we know as club.

Vikings are remembered as some of the greatest shipbuilders in history - is for good reason. Advanced carpenters, Vikings produced ships that were faster, slimmer and lighter than their contemporaries. Perhaps most revered is their invention of the "longboat" which as the name suggests was a long u that was capable of carrying up to 60 Vikings and able to both land and take off from shore swiftly.

While skiing originated in China, it was the Vikings that made it popular in the West. What county is webster tx in fact, the word ski comes from the Old Norse word "skio. We owe the Capital of the Republic of Ireland to the Vikings.

The earliest recording of a settlement here was in A. While the Vikings may not have invented the soap opera, they did create one of the earliest examples of a saga. For example, The Icelandic Sagas, were written by various unknown authors in the 12th, 13th and 14th centuries depicted the period of when the Vikings abandoned their Gods and converted to Christianity. Full of mythology and fantasy, historians treat these as valuable historical fhe of Viking literature.

The Vikings were surprisingly well-groomed, and were even the first known western culture to invent the hair comb. Far from being the unkept warriors traditionally portrayed how to repair a tubeless mtb tyre literature, Vikings took great pride in their appearance and Viking tweezers and razors have also been excavated.

Vikings View Show. Vikings Medieval History. Take a look at just a few things we can thank the Vikings for: 1. Language The Vikings first attacked England in A. Shipbuilding Vikings are remembered as some of the greatest shipbuilders in history - and ofr good reason. Skis While skiing originated in China, it was the Vikings that made it popular in the West.

Sagas While the Vikings may not have invented the soap opera, they did create one of the earliest examples of a saga. Hair combs The Vikings were surprisingly well-groomed, and were even the first known western culture to invent the hair comb. Read more about: Vikings Seven of the most important gods and goddesses in Norse mythology. Most Recent. The moment Britain almost made peace with Hitler.

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Nov 12,  · Andrew 'Bone' Jones is the archaeologist who made the Lloyds Bank Corprolite (i.e. Turd) famous. The LBT is the largest piece of mineralized human faeces eve.

From around A. Over the next three centuries, they would leave their mark as pirates, raiders, traders and settlers on much of Britain and the European continent, as well as parts of modern-day Russia, Iceland, Greenland and Newfoundland.

The exact reasons for Vikings venturing out from their homeland are uncertain; some have suggested it was due to overpopulation of their homeland, but the earliest Vikings were looking for riches, not land. In the eighth century A. Scandinavian furs were highly prized in the new trading markets; from their trade with the Europeans, Scandinavians learned about new sailing technology as well as about the growing wealth and accompanying inner conflicts between European kingdoms.

The Viking predecessors—pirates who preyed on merchant ships in the Baltic Sea—would use this knowledge to expand their fortune-seeking activities into the North Sea and beyond. The culprits—probably Norwegians who sailed directly across the North Sea—did not destroy the monastery completely, but the attack shook the European religious world to its core. Unlike other groups, these strange new invaders had no respect for religious institutions such as the monasteries, which were often left unguarded and vulnerable near the shore.

Two years later, Viking raids struck the undefended island monasteries of Skye and Iona in the Hebrides as well as Rathlin off the northeast coast of Ireland. For several decades, the Vikings confined themselves to hit-and-run raids against coastal targets in the British Isles particularly Ireland and Europe the trading center of Dorestad, 80 kilometers from the North Sea, became a frequent target after They then took advantage of internal conflicts in Europe to extend their activity further inland: after the death of Louis the Pious, emperor of Frankia modern-day France and Germany , in , his son Lothar actually invited the support of a Viking fleet in a power struggle with brothers.

Before long other Vikings realized that Frankish rulers were willing to pay them rich sums to prevent them from attacking their subjects, making Frankia an irresistible target for further Viking activity. By the mid-ninth century, Ireland, Scotland and England had become major targets for Viking settlement as well as raids.

When King Charles the Bald began defending West Frankia more energetically in , fortifying towns, abbeys, rivers and coastal areas, Viking forces began to concentrate more on England than Frankia.

In the wave of Viking attacks in England after , only one kingdom—Wessex—was able to successfully resist. Viking armies mostly Danish conquered East Anglia and Northumberland and dismantled Mercia, while in King Alfred the Great of Wessex became the only king to decisively defeat a Danish army in England. In the first half of the 10th century, English armies led by the descendants of Alfred of Wessex began reconquering Scandinavian areas of England; the last Scandinavian king, Erik Bloodaxe, was expelled and killed around , permanently uniting English into one kingdom.

Meanwhile, Viking armies remained active on the European continent throughout the ninth century, brutally sacking Nantes on the French coast in and attacking towns as far inland as Paris, Limoges, Orleans, Tours and Nimes. In , Vikings stormed Seville then controlled by the Arabs ; in , they plundered Pisa, though an Arab fleet battered them on the way back north.

In the ninth century, Scandinavians mainly Norwegians began to colonize Iceland, an island in the North Atlantic where no one had yet settled in large numbers. By the late 10th century, some Vikings including the famous Erik the Red moved even further westward, to Greenland. According to later Icelandic histories, some of the early Viking settlers in Greenland supposedly led by the Viking hero Leif Eriksson , son of Erik the Red may have become the first Europeans to discover and explore North America.

The midth-century reign of Harald Bluetooth as king of a newly unified, powerful and Christianized Denmark marked the beginning of a second Viking age. Large-scale raids, often organized by royal leaders, hit the coasts of Europe and especially England, where the line of kings descended from Alfred the Great was faltering.

Crowned king of England on Christmas Day in , William managed to retain the crown against further Danish challenges. The events of in England effectively marked the end of the Viking Age. Today, signs of the Viking legacy can be found mostly in the Scandinavian origins of some vocabulary and place-names in the areas in which they settled, including northern England, Scotland and Russia.

In Iceland, the Vikings left an extensive body of literature, the Icelandic sagas, in which they celebrated the greatest victories of their glorious past. But if you see something that doesn't look right, click here to contact us! Subscribe for fascinating stories connecting the past to the present. Advances in Shipbuilding and Navigation Perhaps the most striking of Viking achievements was their state-of-the-art shipbuilding technology, which allowed them to travel greater distances than anyone before them.

Their signature longboats—sleek wooden vessels with shallow The epic voyages of the Vikings to the British Isles, Iceland, North America and points west tend to obscure the fact that the Scandinavian warriors also ventured far to the east across Europe and parts of Asia.

While the Danes and Norwegians sailed west, Swedish fighters and Rollo: First ruler of Normandy This Viking leader, whose origins were either Danish or Norwegian, began conducting raids on France in the ninth century.

In , under the Treaty of St. Not even St. Patrick himself could protect Ireland from the Vikings. When the Nordic raiders launched their first attack on Ireland in A. No heavenly intercession arrived, however, to save their How exactly the seafaring Scandinavians known as the Vikings navigated millions of miles of open water, raiding ports and settling uncharted territories from roughly to A.

Archaeological evidence suggests they traveled with Long celebrated as master shipbuilders and seafarers, the Vikings ruled the waters of the North Atlantic from to A. On clear days, they used a Leif Erikson was the son of Erik the Red, founder of the first European settlement on what is now called Greenland. Around A. According to one school of thought, Erikson sailed off course on his John Cabot or Giovanni Caboto, as he was known in Italian was an Italian explorer and navigator who may have developed the idea of sailing westward to reach the riches of Asia while working for a Venetian merchant.

Though the exact details of his life and expeditions are the The explorer Christopher Columbus made four trips across the Atlantic Ocean from Spain: in , , and He was determined to find a direct water route west from Europe to Asia, but he never did. Instead, he stumbled upon the Americas. Though he did not really Live TV. This Day In History. History Vault.

Who Were the Vikings? Early Viking Raids In A. Conquests in the British Isles By the mid-ninth century, Ireland, Scotland and England had become major targets for Viking settlement as well as raids.

Viking Settlements: Europe and Beyond Meanwhile, Viking armies remained active on the European continent throughout the ninth century, brutally sacking Nantes on the French coast in and attacking towns as far inland as Paris, Limoges, Orleans, Tours and Nimes. Danish Dominance The midth-century reign of Harald Bluetooth as king of a newly unified, powerful and Christianized Denmark marked the beginning of a second Viking age.

Life of a Viking. The Vikings. Viking Women. Globetrotting Vikings: The Quest for Constantinople The epic voyages of the Vikings to the British Isles, Iceland, North America and points west tend to obscure the fact that the Scandinavian warriors also ventured far to the east across Europe and parts of Asia. Did Vikings Use Crystals to Navigate? John Cabot John Cabot or Giovanni Caboto, as he was known in Italian was an Italian explorer and navigator who may have developed the idea of sailing westward to reach the riches of Asia while working for a Venetian merchant.

Christopher Columbus The explorer Christopher Columbus made four trips across the Atlantic Ocean from Spain: in , , and

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